Donuts Are Healthy if God’s the Baker — Life in the Nest

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I had the opportunity to guest-write for my college’s blog. Being a hungry college student who craves encouragement and chocolate, I naturally compared donuts to the Christian faith. Take a look:

Guest post by senior Jenneth Dyck When I was in high school, my donut went missing from my lunchbox. I was in a particularly bad mood that day, and the AWOL dessert almost pushed me over the edge. 25 more words

via Donuts Are Healthy if God’s the Baker — Life in the Nest

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Published In “America’s Emerging Writers” National Edition

america_s_emerging_writers_an_anthology_of_fiction-volume_1_grandeEarlier in 2018, my short story, “Fruits of the Spirit Daycare” was accepted by Z Publishing and printed in their Florida’s Emerging Writers, which makes up their national series, America’s Emerging Writers. 

It was a great experience, and I really enjoyed seeing my name printed alongside so many other talented writers representing the state of Florida. Little did I know that there would also be a national copy set to print just in time for Christmas — and my story made the cut.

While 2,000 entries were accepted for the state-level publishing, making up all 50 states, only 136 of those 2,000 were selected to make up the national edition: America’s Emerging Writers.

You can buy a copy on Amazon, or click here to buy from Z Publishing’s website. Note that there are two volumes to this book. You can find mine in the first volume.

The Writer’s Block Syndrome

This past month, I’ve been struggling with severe writer’s block. I almost never succumb to it’s cold, calloused embrace, but this month has been a doozy for my writer’s mind. What’s worse? I had a paper due; a long paper.

In an attempt to conquer this…impediment…I wrote this short soapbox rant for my nonfiction class:


Writer's Block Syndrome

Today, I have a problem. A real, big-time problem. It’s a problem every writer faces, a problem every writer fears. It comes with no warning, but strikes a quick, agonizing blow to your self-esteem, your peace of mind, and your overall sanity.

I’m talking about writer’s block. The wicked, wicked illness of every writer.

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Cover Reveal and Designs for Author Zachariah Wilhelm

I’m about to mention Zachariah Wilhelm’s awesome new book, A Spark of Light, which is now available on Amazon and Amazon Kindle. Inside you’ll find a collection of short fiction and essays that center on the universal theme of light in a world of darkness. Also, if you want to keep up with his current projects, you can visit him on his website!


In college as a writing major, we get to the end of our education and have to compile a portfolio of all the best work we’ve done in our core writing classes. What’s even more daunting is this: we have to print it in a physical book form, complete with a cover.

Most writers are not graphic designers. We imagine all the cool book covers we’d like to see with our name on them, sure. And we might actually attempt to design a few, but for people at PCC, they typically syphon the project off to a graphic design friend to better focus on the content (since that’s the main part that will be graded).

My portfolio is next semester, but half my class is doing theirs this semester. Eager to practice and attempt a book cover myself while helping my fellow writing friends, I asked Zachariah Wilhelm, who sat next to me in Creative Nonfiction, if he had a cover designer yet. He said no, and the design was due in two weeks.

I volunteered. And boy was I ever excited.

This is what we came up with in the end. He wanted the spark to have severe contrast with the darkness around it, since that’s a strong theme he has throughout his stories: that spark of light in the darkness, that flicker of good in a world of evil. We also wanted to try to connect some of his pieces together with the cover, so we decided to rely on a dark forest and a tire swing, both of which are mentioned in the book.

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Seven “Must Haves” for Freshmen Attending Pensacola Christian College

So you’re about to go to college. More specifically, you’re headed off to Pensacola Christian College in Pensacola, Florida. Likely for the first time, you’ll be living mostly on your own and away from your family. Your main concern? You can’t even load the laundry without spilling bleach everywhere.

Don’t worry; I’m totally there with you. When I graduated from high school, Mom had to force me to go shopping for my graduation party. Sucking back tears in Party City, I remember admitting that shopping for graduation decorations was like planning my own funeral.

Life as I knew it was about to change forever.

But don’t panic! College is legit the best years of your life. It’s the perfect category between being a child and adult: You have enough freedom to take on adult responsibilities all within the safety of your family’s health insurance.

A lot of my internet followers found me through my college vlogs (and video projects) on YouTube, and I’m constantly getting questions about PCC, dorm life, tips and hacks, and general inquiries about packing and living as a college student.

In this article, I’m going to give you seven key must-haves as a college student at PCC:

  • Tide Pods
  • Bed Shelves
  • Mattress Pads
  • Hot Pot and Ramen
  • First Aid
  • Winter Clothes
  • Facebook

And if there are any current students or alumni that find this page, feel free to leave your own suggestions in the comments!

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Seven Ways to Write Betrayal in Your Novel

I don’t know if I’m just sadistic, or if I have some deep buried emotional trauma from my past, or I’m just a stereotypical writer who likes to bring emotional tragedy on her readers…but I’ve always loved betrayal. I love reading it, writing it–it doesn’t matter.

If I really had to guess why betrayal has always been my go-to literary plot device, it might have something to do with the way I think of loyalty. Loyalty is one of the most important qualities a person could have, in my opinion. And sadly, because we’re human, we rarely find that friend who’s loyal until the end.

We’re all disappointed by one another at some point in our lives, but luckily, it’s a common wound we all share, which makes betrayal in novels a powerful tool to wound your readers, yet still have them come crawling back for more.

I’m going to be using the following examples from TV and literature, so if you don’t want to be spoiled, run awaaaay: Treasure Planet, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. season 1, Star Wars, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Inkheart, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Legend by Marie Lu, Mean Girls, and Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

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An Interview with Best-Selling Author Robert Liparulo

When I was a senior in high school, I got the once-in-a-rarity opportunity to interview my favorite author. I grew up reading Robert Liparulo’s teen fiction in junior high. In fact, when the books were coming out, I remember actually having fights with my friends over who got to read the next one first. One particular instance involved me throwing Whirlwind on the table between my two friends as they both dove for it, pleading to the others’ humanity, bribing each other for the chance to read it first.

Good times.

Anyway, the following interview was turned in for my senior writing class, now resurrected here on my blog:

 

220px-Robert_Liparulo,R1-05ARobert Liparulo is the bestselling Christian author of the widely acclaimed teen fiction Dreamhouse Kings series, as well as his adult fiction such as Comes a Horseman, Germ, and his adult series The Immortal Files.

As a creative writing student and a Christian YA author wannabe—not to mention a huge fan of Liparulo’s works—I immediately wanted to try meeting with him for an interview assignment. We worked out a time through email, and I had the privilege to meet with him via Skype Saturday night. Mr. Liparulo was extremely nice and a blast to talk to—very warm and friendly, and he had a great laugh!

Robert Liparulo

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